Does elevator pitch work in hardware startups?

I've been thinking about this question for a while: does elevator pitch, so prevalent in lean startups, also work in hardware startups?

 When I join conferences or events, I usually get pitched by hardware entrepreneurs a lot. With shiny eyes they usually start like this:

We have created a XXX device that could be plugged into OOO in your home and allows you to control your YYY in an WWW way. The data are stored in our cloud and ...

Such entrepreneurs usually rehearsed well enough before they approach me. Some of them sound a bit insincere and robotic, but most are passionate and ernest. Some have prototypes with them and others hold an iPad in front of me showing the 3D drawings.

However, I seldom got ticked enough on the floor and always gave them my cards and ask them to send me their pitch deck.

I think the main reason is that we do consumer electronics mostly and consumer electronics are never just about "what the product does". For every "function" I might have hear at least 3~4 entrepreneurs pitch to me and expect to hear many more. It's also not how the battle is won in general.

Today hardware functions are copied almost immediately without much barrier as soon as they gain a bit of meaningful traction among the users. The real differentiators of a consumer electronics product remain design, UI/UX, marketing, branding, community, etc. And these are impossible to gauge in an elevator pitch.

For example, I've seen good product design but extremely ugly slides, indicating that the founding team has little sense in what a good design is. This is not to say the founders have to be designers themselves. However, if design is supposed to be a big differentiator for the product, the lack of design thinking in the founders is lethal, as anyone could hire the same design agency to deliver similarly attract hardware products and the entrepreneurs won't be able to evolve and defend themselves.

To assess these quintessential qualities of the hardware entrepreneurs, it's usually easier to take a look at the deck, the video and the website. When a team is not that sensitive and adamant on design, UI/UX, marketing, branding or community, it could usually be detected in the deck, the video and the website. 

I could only speak for myself, but I sincerely suggest that the hardware entrepreneurs spare the elevator pitch time (of both themselves and the VCs) and just get the VCs' email addresses. Send a 10-page deck with succinct description of the value proposition and the differentiation. At least in my case, it'd be more effective than rumbling along:

We have created a XXX device that could be plugged into OOO in your home and allows you to control your YYY in an WWW way. The data are stored in our cloud and ...

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